• Is there anything I should look at when thinking about success rates?

    There are a few areas to consider as well as the above:

    1. How large is the data being collected to derive the statistics? Small numbers of treatment cycles can give higher results just by chance. Our statistics include at least 500-1000 cycles of treatment to give a representative picture.
    2. What is the rate of twins and triplets? Many international clinics increase their IVF pregnancy rate by transferring more than one embryo.
    3. What proportions of women were stopped before their IVF egg collection? Fertility Associates’ ‘Pathway to a Child’ booklet give this information.
  • What should I consider when looking at success rates?

    It is useful to look at:

    • How large is the data being collected to derive the statistics? Small numbers of treatment cycles can give higher results just by chance. Our statistics include at least 500-1000 cycles of treatment to give a representative picture.
    • What is the rate of twins and triplets? Many international clinics increase their IVF pregnancy rate by transferring more than one embryo.
    • What proportions of women were stopped before their IVF egg collection? Fertility Associates’ ‘Pathway to a Child’ booklet can you give this information.
  • What should I ask the doctor at my first appointment?

    Here is a list of possible questions you may want to ask at your first appointment:

    • What is the best next step?
    • Given my age, what are my chances?
    • Given my age, should I wait or act now?
    • What lifestyle changes can I make to boost my chance of success (eg, diet, exercise, stopping smoking, etc)? How will these help?
    • Who will be the team caring for me? Who should I contact if I have a question?
    • What are the treatment costs expected?
    • Am I eligible for Fertility Cover?
    • What treatments are options? 
    • What would you recommend and why?
    • What is my chance of having a baby in the next 12 and 24 months without treatment?
    • How likely is fertility treatment to be successful for me? (While no doctor can give you an exact answer to this question, taking into account your personal medical information and age, your doctor's past experiences may allow him or her to roughly estimate your chance of success).
  • Instead of having a vasectomy reversal can sperm be retrieved from the testis and used for fertilisation?

    Unfortunately, this is not as easy as it sounds because the sperm in the vas and epididymis have been present for a long time because of the blockage and are often old, degenerated and lacking in fertilising potential. Also, sperm numbers are too low to inseminate into the woman therefore IVF technology has to be used. Now that IVF is more successful, it is sometimes a more suitable option than a reversal and so it is always best to discuss your situation with a fertility specialist before deciding on a vasectomy reversal.


    A vasectomy reversal in men with less than a 15 year gap may give rise to as good a chance of a pregnancy as one IVF/ICSI cycle, and so a reversal is usually chosen as the first option.

  • Can we retrieve and store sperm while having a vasectomy reversal, since IVF/ICSI entails sperm retrieval from the epididymis or testes?

    This is called Micro Epididymal Sperm Aspiration – MESA. As my chances with a vasectomy reversal are lower than average because of the long duration from vasectomy. The MESA procedure should not compromise the chances of success from vasectomy reversal.

  • Why would sperm fail to return to the ejaculate?

    The most common reason is due to a blockage at the reversal site. Sperm tends to leak out of the operation site on the vas when a reversal has been performed. If excessive, the leakage can give rise to scaring.

    The second cause of a failed reversal is where there has been a secondary blockage in the epididymis due to the back-pressure from the original vasectomy. Since some men who have no sperm in the cut end of the vas at the reversal procedure subsequently get sperm in their ejaculate over time, it is usually not possible to diagnose this secondary blockage at the time of the vasectomy reversal operation. An operation to bypass this blockage is called a vaso-epididymostomy and can be associated with a 25 % chance of a pregnancy.

    Finally, in a very few men, sperm production in the testes may have ceased following vasectomy. If this is thought to be the cause in your case, then a testicular biopsy should clarify this.

  • Are their any alternatives to a vasectomy reversal and IVF/ICSI/sperm retrieval?

    Yes, this would be the use of donor sperm and sometimes couples choose this option. Although much simpler and usually giving rise to a better chance of a family, there are many differences that must be clearly understood before couples choose this option.

  • Would I make a good sperm donor?

    • You will need to be aged between 20 and 45 years
    • You will need to have a good sperm count (we will test this along the way)
    • You must be happy to be identified. Donors may be contacted in the future by the parents who received, or the children born from, your sperm donation
    • It is best if you have already had your children. Knowing what is like to have children, often helps our donors in making the decision to become a donor. However if you do not have children you can still become a sperm donor
    • When we ask people what sort of person they would want as a donor they usually ask for "someone nice."
  • How does TiMI work with PGS?

    Difference between TiMI & PGS and how they can work together.

    Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) is the strongest embryo selection tool we have since we know that many normal appearing embryos have the wrong number of chromosomes (aneuploidy).
     
    The challenge with PGS is that it requires blastocysts on day 5 or 6 for testing – probably 3 or more.
     
    TiMI complements PGS because it provides the best undisturbed environment we have available in order to get as many blastocysts as possible.
     
    While the extra information we gain from watching the embryos with TiMI is helpful when not using PGS, it does not add to the selection process when PGS is used.
     
    The challenge most patients face is knowing how many embryos they’ll have to work with. If the number is few, then TiMI is a safe way to increase your chances. If there are 3 or more blastocysts, then PGS alone or in combination with TiMI may be the better option.


    Read our blog on TiMI here

  • Is Timi a per cycle cost?

    The fee for TiMI is a per cycle cost. We would be monitoring your embryos from one cycle. With a maximum of 12 embryos per cycle.